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    7 Habits of Effective Swimmers

    By / December 9, 2016

     1. Take responsibility for your swim.

    Be honest with yourself about your effort and practice habits.
    Look honestly at the practices and lifestyle choices that can affect your swim.
    Stop blaming others or equipment for a bad day or practice. Evaluate and change
    what can be changed, namely how you react to things. Positive reactions net
    positive results.

    2. Define your mission and your goals.

    Have a plan and share it with your teammates and coaches.
    Without a plan or goals you have no chance of achievement. Even if your goals
    are not met as quickly as you would like or if your plans have to change, you
    can still make the most of every situation and opportunity.

    3. Prioritize swimming in your life.

    Put first things first. We can do anything in life, we can’t do
    everything! Putting first priorities first allows you time to achieve those
    things that are important to you. Share your priorities with your coaches so
    your goals and their expectations match.

    4. Think Win-Win, individual and team

    If each member of the team succeeds, then we all succeed. If you
    boost your teammate up, you lift yourself to new heights at the same time.
    Especially in swimming, someone doesn’t have to lose for us to win. Everyone can
    achieve new time standards at the meet. Multiple people can swim southeastern
    and sectional qualifying times at a meet. Two high-point awards are common.

    5. Listen to coaches and teammates sincerely.

    We all have a different perspective, so if we listen and see
    things from the other perspective, we can then share our own. Greater
    understanding of our own needs are then achieved and we are better able to help
    each other.

    6. Synergize – work as a team to achieve more.

    Celebrate differences, Work as a team, Be open minded, Find new
    and better ways. There are many examples of synergy at work if life. A band
    takes individual instruments and puts it together to create something better
    than each could create alone. In swimming, more best times are posted on relays
    because everyone swims better with a team giving support.

    7. Renew yourself regularly.

    Eat well, Sleep well, Take care of yourself. Training breaks
    us down, so recovery can build us back stronger. Without recovery, you will
    never achieve your maximum potential.

    A little about HABIT!

    Habit will make or break you in swimming and in life. Habit
    can be your biggest help or your worst enemy. The choice, today, tomorrow and
    always will be – what habits do we keep to make us the best that we can be, and
    which habits do we work to change that drag us down. If you do nothing else
    today, pick a habit that is creating drag in the pool or in your life and start
    to change it.

    10 Minutes to a Healthy Shoulder

    By / December 8, 2016

    Do each exercise once or twice per day, one arm at a time.

    Do 50 reps with a 3 – 5 lb dumbbell.

    If you can’t complete 50 reps, reduce the weight, not the reps!

    A soup can is better than no weight.

    IMPORTANT! Lower the weight slowly in all exercises.

    • Biceps Curls: Do them standing and to full extension.
    • Reverse Biceps Curls: Same as above, but turn hand in the opposite direction (palm out).
    • Front Lift: Arm straight down, palm forward – raise to front until arm is parallel to the floor, then lower slowly.
    • Reverse Front Lift: Same as above, but start with palm facing back and thumb turned down.
    • Out to Side: Same as above but start with palm facing in and lift out to the side.
    • Abduction: Bend forward at waist, arm hanging straight down with palm facing in. Raise arm across body until the inside of the forearm crosses your chest. Lower arm slowly to the starting point.
    • Adduction: Same as above, but raise arm out to the side, parallel to the floor, then lower slowly.
    • Side Lift: Lying on your side, top arm against your body (elbow lying on your rib cage) in the handshake position, rotate arm so the weight points to the ceiling. Then lower slowly.
    • Wing Lift: Still lying on your side, hold your top elbow against your ribs, bent to 90 degrees. Slowly raise the weight until it points to the ceiling, then lower it slowly.
    • Reverse Wing Lift: Lie on your back, holding your arm palm up with the elbow bent to 90 degrees, and your upper arm close to your side. Slowly raise the weight to the ceiling and then lower it slowly.

    Parents Survival Guide

    By / December 7, 2016

    (for a first meet)

    100529-N-8689C-032 CARY, N.C. (May 29, 2010) Swimmers compete while parents and coaches cheer during the 8th annual National Black Heritage Championship Swim Meet at Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary, N.C. U.S. Navy SEALs attended the event to speak with swimmers and coaches about opportunities available within the Navy special warfare community. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joseph M. Clark/Released)

    It is time to take your child to his/her first swim meet!  The purpose of this quick, light-hearted guide is to give parents an idea of what to expect at a swim meet.

    A.  What to bring:

    Required:  Swimmer with all equipment (extra goggles/towel are a plus)

    Optional:  Chairs or blankets to sit on between events

    Light nutritious snacks and drinks

    Books/crayons/etc. to keep busy between events

    Pen and highlighter

    B.  When to go:

    A day or two before the meet, definitive warm-up times will be announced.  Some meets have more than one warm-up session, so you want to be sure you get there for the right one.  At large meets, it is a good idea to get there a little early so you can find a good place to set up your stuff.

    C.  At the meet (during warm-ups/before start):

    1.  Get yourself a heat sheet.  (Just about anyone at the meet can point out the table where they are on sale.  Price is usually $3 to $7).  The heat sheet is a print-out of the order of events and the order of go for the swimmers.  Check to see that your swimmer is listed for all the events she/he entered.

    2.  Write on your swimmer (optional but VERY helpful, especially with multiple swimmers).  Many parents will write their swimmer’s events on their arms or leg in some variation of the following format:

    E-H-L ______

    E  stands for EVENT number

    H  stands for HEAT number

    L  stands for LANE number

    _______ the space lists distance and stroke

    Not only does this make it easy for the swimmer to look up their next event, but now just about any volunteer/parent at the meet will be able to help a lost swimmer figure out when they are supposed to swim next.  However, it is still important to follow the meet as it progresses to avoid missing an event.

    D.  Swimmers take your mark………..

    1.  The coaches like to talk to the swimmers before and after their swim.. Give your swimmer time to stop by and still make it to the staring blocks.  The more swimmers at the meet the sooner she/he should stop the the coaches’ table.

    2.  Get to the “blocks”:

    Bullpen:  Most meets have a “bullpen” for the 8 & under swimmers.  This group of brave volunteers lines up the kids and gets them to the right lanes for their event.  They usually start getting the kids organized 2 events before the one they are swimming in.  Either listen for announcements calling swimmers to the bullpen or watch for activity there.

    Other swimmers:  Older children/those not in bullpen should be at the start end of the pool and getting by their lane during the event preceding theirs.  If there aren’t many heats in the preceding event they may want to get there even sooner.  It is the swimmer’s responsibility to be be in place for his/her event.  There are usually plenty of volunteers to help or answer questions about where to go or how soon they should be heading to the blocks.

    3.  Relays:  Most meets have relays at the end of the session.  The coaches decide who will be on relay teams, so parents don’t need to sign up their swimmers for relays.  However, please check with the coach before you leave with your swimmer after his/her events to make sure they aren’t needed for a relay.  If we don’t have enough swimmers. then the relay has to scratch.  When you enter a meet and know that you won’t be able to stay until the end of a session please tell the coach and note that on your meet entries, so your swimmer won’t be counted towards a relay team.

    4.  Disqualifications:  fondly referred to as ‘DQ’s” (not Dairy Queen):  Not a big deal.  There are two types of swimmers.  Those that have been DQ’d and those that will eventually get a DQ.  Officials watch the swimmers to ensure that the strokes are performed legally.  This is to prevent any unfair advantages and to let the coaches and swimmers know what areas need improvement.  (It’s much easier to correct mistakes BEFORE they become habit).  Most of the young swimmers are happy just to make it to the end of the pool and don’t know/care about DQ’s.  Other swimmers can rest assured that they are in good company should they get one.  Even Olympic swimmers get DQ’d.  (Ed Moses got one at a U.S. meet).  NOTE:  Questions should not be directed to the officials.

    5.  Results:  The results of each event will be posted as soon as possible and include the swimmer’s official time.  The coaches pick up all awards from the meet and have them placed in the swimmer’s folder at the pool.

    E.  Most important:

    Enjoy the meet!!!!!!!!!!!  Swim meets are lots of fun!  If you have any questions about what’s going ask any seasoned swim Mom or Dad.  We were all in your shoes once too!

    Some etiquette/terms to know:

    Starts:  No flash photography during starts.  There is a strobe that flashes to start the swimmers and a camera flash can be confusing to swimmers and cause a false start.  Also, spectators should keep quiet after the “swimmers take your mark” command is given.

    Whistle starts:  Used for starts at most meets.  Referee will blow a whistle 4 times (quick and short) signaling the swimmers to get ready.  One long whistle is the signal for the swimmers to step up on the block (or step in the water for backstroke starts).

    Overhead starts:  Used at some meets to keep swim meet moving along quickly.  After swimmers finish their swim, they remain in the water close to the wall while the next heat starts.  (The next heat to swim will usually be on the blocks waiting for the last swimmer in the heat in the water in the water to finish).  As soon as the next heat starts and is in the water, the waiting swimmers climb quickly out of the water.  NOTE:  Overhead starts are not used for backstroke.

    Swim Lessons

    By / December 6, 2016

    SWIM LESSONS & PRIVATE COACHING

    Winter: Private Coaching Only Available

    Location: Woodlands Pool

    Semi-Private Lessons must be with swimmers that are at comparable levels that have the same general goals for that session.

    Sessions are schedule on a first come – first serve basis. You may request a specific Coach, but all arrangements are done through the team, through the coach coordinator.

    Contact the Team

    Summer: Group Lessons at all ages and levels are available.

    Location: Parkwood Pool

    Lesson are available at 8:30 am, 9:30 am, 10:30 am and 5:00 pm

    Cost $70 per session ($5 discount for multiple family members)

    Contact Recreation Services 897-3664

    1050 Bay Drive to register

    Summer Calendar

    Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
    May 29

    1st Session

    Begins

    30

    *

    31

    *

    June 1

    *

    4

    *

    5

    *

    6

    *

    7

    Session 1

    Ends

    8

    Weather Day

    Session 1

    11

    2nd Session

    Begins

    12

    **

    13

    **

    14

    **

    15

    Weather Day

    Session 2

    18

    **

    19

    **

    20

    **

    21

    Session 2

    Ends

    22

    Weather Day

    Session 2

    25

    3rd Session

    Begins

    26

    ***

    27

    ***

    28

    ***

    29

    Weather Day

    Session 3

    July 2

    ***

    3

    ***

    4

    No Classes

    Happy 4th

    5

    ***

    6

    Session 3

    Ends

    9

    4th Session

    Begins

    10

    ****

    11

    ****

    12

    ****

    13

    Weather Day

    Session 4

    16

    ****

    17

    ****

    18

    ****

    19

    Session 4

    Ends

    20

    Weather Day

    Session 4

    Private Lessons and Coaching are also available during the summer.

    Contact the Team to schedule

    Private 1 hour Lesson with Film – $60

    Private 1 hour Lesson – $40

    Semi- Private 1 hour Lesson with Film – $40 each

    Semi – Private 1 hour Lesson – $30 each

    Private 1/2 hour Lesson – $25

    Semi – Private 1/2 hour Lesson – $20 each

    Competition As A Team

    By / December 6, 2016



    How swimmers compete as a Team



    (and why everyone is needed)

    A swim team is different from other sports teams in that athletes participate individually as well as for the team. The team isn’t always visible as a team because you do not get to see the whole team participating at a meet. There are morning and afternoon sessions with different age groups participating in each session.

         Relays are probably the most visible time you see the team as a team. As in all sports, athletes practice to get ready for their games or in swimming their meets, therefore teams need all or as many of their athletes participating in order to make a good team showing. In other sports, trophies are given out at the end of the season to the winning teams, in swimming trophies are given out to the top three teams at each meet. 


        Team points are made by swimmers and relays placing in the top 6th or 8th place depending on size of pool, 6 lanes or 8 lanes. Points earned for these places are ,in a 6 lane pool, from 1st to 6th: 7,5,4,3, 2,1 and relays points double 14,10,8,6,4,2. In a 8 lane pool scoring is from 1st to 8th : 9,7,6,5,4,3,2,1 and relays 18,14,12,10,8,6,4,2. As you can see relays are very important in acquiring team points.


        Performances at meets gives the coach a yard stick as to what needs to be worked on by the team and individual swimmers during workouts. It also allows the swimmers a measurement of where their fitness level is in relationship to the time of the season and their dedication to practice.


        Team performances allow the Team to remember that Together Each Achieves More is not only true but fun!

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